Jim Erpenbach DDS

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Bulk Restorations Fall Short

Bulk restorations are a popular way for dentists to treat cavities. Although they are popular with many dentists, they may actually not be the best method of treatment. Dr. Erpenbach does not use bulk restorations to treat cavities and uses biomimetic dental restorations instead.

Bulk restorations became popular because they allowed dentists to fill cavities faster. They require fewer steps that metal amalgam fillings, which means dentists were able to treat patients faster, ultimately giving them the ability to treat more patients during the day, too. Unlike metal amalgam fillings, there is no risk of exposure to poisonous mercury; a factor that makes them more popular with patients, Another benefit is that they are tooth-colored versus the telltale silver amalgam, which makes it less obvious that the patient has fillings.

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Researchers Find Rheumatoid Arthritis May Be Caused by Mouth Bacteria

Rheumatoid arthritis is a painful joint condition suffered by 1.5 million Americans according to the Centers for Disease Control. The condition, also known as RA, is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s immune system targets healthy synovial tissue located around the joints. Rheumatoid arthritis can be triggered by illnesses or certain medical conditions, but researchers at Johns Hopkins University have found a link between RA and a particular type of bacteria found in the mouth. These new findings may lead to new treatments for patients suffering from RA, as well as methods of prevention.

These bacteria are known to cause periodontal infections but have also been found to cause RA. These bacteria confuse the body, which mistakes its own tissue as foreign invaders. This confusion prompts an immune system response in order to destroy these imagined foreign bodies by attacking the tissue of the synovium. The synovium, also known as the synovial membrane, is the soft tissue found in the joints that serve to cushion the joints as they move or glide.

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Damage Control: Stopping Pulp Disease Early On

When tooth decay goes untreated, cavities form in the tooth’s hard outer enamel. These cavities are a gateway for bacteria to reach the rest of the tooth. When bacteria reach the inner living pulp of the tooth, the pulp becomes diseased and patients typically experience extreme pain and sensitivity, along with infection. Diseases that impact the dental pulp can lead to total tooth loss. There are treatments available to treat dental pulp disease, but some of these treatments may also lead to emergency extractions.

There are several types of pulp disease, medically known as pulpitis that infects the soft, sensitive living tissue called the pulp. These different types range from reversible or mild pulpits to dangerous infections caused by pulp exposure. All of these types are painful and cause serious infections or tooth loss.

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Manage Your Mouth Guard

April is National Facial Protection Month, sponsored by the American Academy of Sports Dentistry. During April, the AASD encourages youth and adult athletes to wear mouth guards to protect the teeth from injury or trauma during athletics or sporting events. Wearing a mouth guard will definitely help to protect the teeth, but improper care of the mouth guard will negatively impact oral and total health.

There are several types of sports mouthguards on the market. Some are basic off the shelf types or stock types that do not need any preparation before using. Boil and bite guards are another type, and must be softened in boiling water and formed around the teeth by biting down. Another type is a personalized protective guard designed by a dental professional through impression mold casting.

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How to Positively Influence Your Children to Take Care of Their Teeth

Family and friends often influence the way we think and how we behave. These groups influence us from sports teams we like to the music we listen to, and even to the clothes we wear. Researchers have also found that family and friends even influence how we with think about and care for our teeth.

Boston University’s Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine determined through extensive research of families living in Boston’s public housing that individuals with good oral health were taught how to practice proper oral hygiene by their family or peers. Conversely, individuals with negative oral health conditions were not encouraged or instructed by their family and friends to practice good oral hygiene.

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