If You Are What You Eat, Are You A Turkey?

Thanksgiving is often referred to as “Turkey Day,” and for good reason – an estimated 48 million turkeys will be served tomorrow! While serving your feast this year, let your guests in on a few facts about traditions surrounding this feathered bird.

Fun Facts About Turkey:

  • Last year, the U.S. raised 244 million turkeys, according…

Thanksgiving is often referred to as “Turkey Day,” and for good reason – an estimated 48 million turkeys will be served tomorrow! While serving your feast this year, let your guests in on a few facts about traditions surrounding this feathered bird.

Fun Facts About Turkey:

  • Last year, the U.S. raised 244 million turkeys, according to the National Turkey Federation. Of these, 46 million were eaten at Thanksgiving. This year, it’s expected that 248 million turkeys will be raised.
  • The average weight of a turkey purchased at Thanksgiving is 16 pounds, consisting of roughly 70 percent white meat and 30 percent dark meat.
  • In 2009, the average American consumed 13 pounds of Turkey.
  • It’s thought that the Pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians celebrated the first Thanksgiving in 1621. But it wasn’t until 1863 that President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday.
  • Turkey most likely wasn’t the main dish at the First Thanksgiving. Experts agree that the Pilgrims and Wampanoag Indians probably feasted on venison, Indian corn, and some type of fowl.
  • Domesticated turkeys cannot fly. Wild turkeys, however, can fly short distances and reach speeds up to 25 miles per hour on the ground.
  • Beginning with Harry Truman in 1947, each year, the National Turkey Federation has presented the president with a live turkey. President Truman was the first president to grant an official pardon to a turkey. This lucky bird then retires to spend the rest of its days at Mount Vernon.

The Wishbone Tradition

It’s a common Thanksgiving tradition: two people hold opposite sides of the V-shaped turkey bone, and then pull it apart. The person with the larger piece of bone is declared winner, and is granted with a wish. Experts agree that this superstition was practiced in Medieval Europe, though goose-bones were used. Another legend states that the tradition dates back to ancient Etruscans of Northern Italy and Romans. The two groups would fight over dried chicken bones. Legend states that there weren’t enough bones to go around, so fights erupted over who would receive the bone.

This year, Dr. Erpenbach and our staff are thankful for our wonderful patients, and we wish you a safe and Happy Thanksgiving.

To schedule an appointment, please contact us at (865) 240-2035.

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