Oral-Systemic Health Explained

Categories: Dental Health

Regular research links oral health to the health of the whole body. This connection is often referred to as the oral-systemic health link. Because the mouth is often the first place bacteria enter the body, controlling bacteria in your mouth will reduce the potential for it entering your bloodstream. Gum disease, which affects about 80% of…

Regular research links oral health to the health of the whole body. This connection is often referred to as the oral-systemic health link. Because the mouth is often the first place bacteria enter the body, controlling bacteria in your mouth will reduce the potential for it entering your bloodstream. Gum disease, which affects about 80% of Americans, is linked to health complications, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes complications, and dementia.

Germs in the Mouth

Plaque and bacteria can build up and enter blood vessels, then travel through the body. Some scientists believe that the plaque in the mouth causes plaque buildup in the arteries, thus leading to cardiovascular problems. Just as oral health negatively impacts overall health, conditions such as diabetes can affect oral health. For example, diabetics often suffer from dry mouth. Without adequate saliva, bacteria can build up and lead to periodontal disease. Pregnancy, too, causes hormonal changes that which can affect the gums and contribute to the development of gingivitis, the mildest form of gum disease.

Preventing Oral Health Issues

  • Brush teeth twice a day using a fluoridated toothpaste and soft bristled toothbrush
  • Before brushing in the evening, floss to remove plaque and food lodged between teeth
  • Before brushing ,use a tongue scraper or floss to dislodge plaque and germs on the tongue
  • Never use alcohol-based mouthwash because it can dry out your mouth and, ultimately, allow more bacterial buildup
  • Visit Dr. Erpenbach for professional six-month cleanings, check-ups, x-rays, and oral cancer screenings

Visit your Knoxville Dentist

Dr. Erpenbach is a member of the American Association for Oral Systemic Health, and he diligently researches the latest developments regarding the oral-systemic health link. In addition, he practices biomimetic restorative dentistry, so you can depend on his dental work to look and feel natural. If your gums bleed, feel tender, or are swollen, or if you need a checkup and cleaning, schedule an appointment today by calling (865) 584- 8630.