Wanted for Conspiracy to Commit Cavities: Sugar a.k.a. “High Fructose Corn Syrup”

If you are a frequent reader of our dental blogs, you know that sugar is a big contributor to cavities. As one of the main culprits of oral health disasters, sugar combines with S.mutans to create acid which attacks tooth enamel. The result is weakened defenses against bacteria and tooth decay. While you may be aware that sugar is an antagonist on…

If you are a frequent reader of our dental blogs, you know that sugar is a big contributor to cavities. As one of the main culprits of oral health disasters, sugar combines with S.mutans to create acid which attacks tooth enamel. The result is weakened defenses against bacteria and tooth decay. While you may be aware that sugar is an antagonist on your oral health, you may not be aware of sugar’s many aliases. In this week’s blog, Knoxville family dentist, Dr. Erpenbach, will explain how you can protect yourself against this runaway tooth enamel destroyer.

Know the Many Names of Sugar

In a recent ad campaign for America’s government subsidized corn crops, commercials portrayed mothers defending high fructose corn syrup. Their argument is that the sugary substance is made from a natural one: corn. Regardless of the highly processed, highly unnatural way of manufacturing high fructose corn syrup, the results on teeth are still the same. High fructose corn syrup should read “sugar”, when you examine the labels of beverages and snacks.

Othernames for sugar include:

  • Lactose
  • Glucose
  • Dextrose
  • Fructose
  • Cane sugar
  • Castro sugar
  • Agave nectar
  • Sorbitol
  • Panocha
  • Cane crystals
  • Barley malt

Consume Sugar with Care

If you notice any of these seemingly harmless ingredients on nutritional information, know that this product contains sugar. If you are going to consume sugary beverages or foods, do so in moderation. In addition, drink plenty of water to wash away acid on your teeth and prevent enamel erosion. Since sugary substances temporarily soften your tooth enamel, avoid reintroducing sugar into your mouth over long periods of time. Instead, eat sweets quickly, drink plenty of water in conjunction, and brush your teeth at least one hour afterward.

Preventive Dentistry in Knoxville

For more information about cavity prevention, contact our Knoxville dental office at 865-240-2035. Dr. Erpenbach as well as our team of dental professionals looks forward to helping you restore your optimal oral health with conservative periodontal disease treatment.

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