Immune System Effected by Gum Disease, Says Knoxville Dentist

We hear about gum disease on commercials for dental hygiene products, and when we speak to our dental hygienist and dentist at our six month checkups. Do you realize how very prevalent this bacterial infection of the gingival tissues is in America? A whopping 80% of people in the United States are thought to have gingivitis (early gum disease) or…

We hear about gum disease on commercials for dental hygiene products, and when we speak to our dental hygienist and dentist at our six month checkups. Do you realize how very prevalent this bacterial infection of the gingival tissues is in America? A whopping 80% of people in the United States are thought to have gingivitis (early gum disease) or worse. Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is the bacteria found in our mouths that causes periodontal disease (gum disease). A new study connects gum disease to your body’s immune system, and will be highlighted in today’s blog from your Knoxville dentist, Dr. Jim Erpenbach.

Immune System Manipulation

The scientific research performed at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Alabama in Birmingham was recently published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. Researchers focused on the aforementioned P. gingivalis to see if the bacteria could be found beyond the mouth. What was discovered was that these particular bacteria possess the ability to manipulate the immune system. This disables normal immune system processes that are designed to naturally destroy the bacteria. T-cells normally protect people from gum disease, but their ability to fight appears to be simple disabled by P. gingivalis

Fighting Gum Disease One Study at a Time

The research involved mice that were exposed to the P. gingivalis bacteria. Half of the rodents were then given an inhibiting antibody, while the other half remained the control group. The cells of the mice were tested for something called interferon gamma production. The mice whose cells were treated presented with an increase in interferon gamma production. Mice that were untreated remained the same. These findings may help battle gum disease more effectively in the future. Scientists point out the importance of prevention or early intervention in the form of a potential vaccine looks promising based on this research.

Dental Checkups from Knoxville Dentist

Keep your teeth and gums healthy by visiting your Knoxville dentist regularly. If you would like to schedule an appointment with our 37919 dentist office, you can call (865) 240-2035. We welcome patients from Knoxville and the greater metropolitan area.

Read more http://68.178.130.8/~erpenbac/knoxvilledentist.co/?p=667

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